Archives and History News: from Ireland to Nepal, Ukraine to Australia, and a debate about the European Union…

Good news for anyone doing genealogy research in Ireland – 40,000 records are going to be made available via a new website. The National Gallery of Ireland has digitised the catholic parish records dating from 1740s to the 1880s and the free website is going live in July.

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Archives and History News: archives lost through fire, looting and obsolescence…

So far, 2015 has not been a happy year for archives and cultural heritage.

There was a huge fire at the Academic Institute of Scientific Information on Social Sciences in Moscow. It’s one of Russia’s largest libraries, and it’s pretty much devastated, with an estimated 1 million manuscripts burnt to a crisp.

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Archives and History News: First World War collections under threat, Downton Abbey, and digital asylum records

In case you hadn’t noticed, some kind of global conflict thing started 100 years ago. The Tower of London’s moat became a beautiful sea of ceramic poppies to commemorate British soldiers who died during the First World War. The Imperial War Museum re-opened its revamped galleries to much fanfare. Then the government decided to slash the museum’s funding by £4 million! The museum will absorb these cuts by closing its library, slashing or shutting down education services, and cutting jobs. So now we can see exactly how our government really feel about this important aspect of our history. It’s all right for people to enjoy art installations, as long as they don’t start actually, you know, learning anything, doing any research, or finding things out for themselves. Heritage is lovely – as long as we don’t have to pay for it, and everyone involved is a volunteer. This is a shocking scandal. Yes I know we could spend our money on far more worthy things than heritage, blah blah, but it’s the sheer hypocrisy of the thing that makes my blood boil. If you feel as strongly outraged as I do, please sign this petition to prevent the funding cuts. Please also publicise this, and urge others to sign the petition.

The Imperial War Museum

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Archives and History News: October 2014

On Thursday 30th October you can come to the Natural History Museum and hear me give a talk on Piltdown man – the greatest scientific hoax in history! In 1912 scientists at the Natural History Museum discovered Piltdown Man, the supposed missing evolutionary link between apes and humans. Forty years later the remains were found to be fake. Delve into the archives to uncover what really happened and decide who you think is the fraudster in this unsolved mystery…

This is part of the Halloween-themed trick or treat night safari of the museum. It should be a great night if you like to geek out about science and the natural world!

And there’s more science in the archives this month.

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Archives and History News: beetles, beer and black heritage!

The dress that actress Ellen Terry wore to play Lady MacBeth at the Lyceum theatre in 1888, has been restored by the National Trust. The dress was covered in the wings of iridescent green beetles. It’s horribly fascinating and suitably gothic!  Here she is, her famous performance and dress immortalized in fine Pre-Raphaelite style by John Singer Sergant. You can see the original at Tate Britain.

Ellen Terry as Lady MacBeth

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Archives and History News: Glastonbury Festival, women in the First World War, and sound recordings!

Glastonbury festival has gradually moved from from hippy counter-culture to mainstream middle-class staple. The V&A now keeps an archive about Glastonbury, the final nail in the counter-culture coffin. Glastonbury is dead. Long live Glastonbury!

An image from the V&A’s Glastonbury archive

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Archives and History News: Andy Warhol, Sinn Fein, Jeff Beck, Aboriginal photography, Mussolini and the LAPD!!

Digital art by Andy Warhol

The archives world is very concerned with digital obsolescence. This may seem like an obscure topic, but it’s one that’s increasingly going to affect our lives. In 1985 Andy Warhol created some digital artworks and saved them on Amiga disks. After a painstaking 3-year project, they’ve now been recovered from that obsolete data format. That’s not a problem you have to worry about with art on canvas. Continue reading

News: genealogy and gin

I have an article out in the June issue of Family Tree Magazine, all about eighteenth century hospital records, specifically maternity records, and how to use them in genealogy research. It’s a great issue, with features on Victorian fatherhood, tracing your police ancestors, the bawdy courts, asylum handicrafts, the First World War, and more!

Yes - I am drinking a gin cocktail from a shoe!

Yes – I am drinking a gin cocktail from a shoe!

Last Wednesday I went on an incredible Gin Journey with a company called Shake, Rattle and Stir. For the princely sum of £50 we were taken on a chauffeur-driven tour of five fabulous and hard to find London bars, tasted 5 samples of artisanal gin, and drank five incredible gin cocktails, while learning all about the history and production of this wonderfully English spirit. Much of that knowledge has mysteriously faded away from mind… but I can tell you that gin is simply vodka flavoured with juniper (and other botanicals), and that a mere ten gin and tonics will be enough to prevent you getting malaria!

The ultimate gin and tonic - exclusive to the Gin Journey!

The ultimate gin and tonic – exclusive to the Gin Journey!

Archives and History News!

Archivists and conservators the world over face all the same problems – protecting vast collections from the ravages of time, and official indifference. In theory, this sounds a little dry, but in practice it can be very exciting. For example…

A unique collection of over 30,000 photographs, documenting 120 years of life inside Buddhist monasteries in Laos, has been digitised thanks to The British Library’s Endangered Archives programme. The images are not all online yet, but it looks like a fascinating collection, giving a unique insight into the monastic way of life.

An image from the Buddhist archive of photography

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Archives and History News!

A lovely photo of Sir Leopold Aleksander – You’re welcome, dear readers!

On Wednesday 26th February I made my first visit to St Bart’s Pathology Museum. We were treated to a very interesting lecture by Dr Ellery Foutch on Victorian strongman Eugen Sandow (though I have to say excitement was running so high we all found it a little hard to concentrate) before the main event – a performance by the magnificent Sir Leopold Alexander, Lion of London and Mighty Moustache! I’ve seen him perform before, but how could anyone ever tire of such magnificence? Continue reading